Faculty Concerns

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General:

M. Mitchell Waldrop. "Science 2.0 - Is Open Access Science the Future?" Scientific American (April 2008)

Diane Harley, Sarah Earl-Novell, Sophia Krzys Acord, Shannon Lawrence, and C. Judson King. Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication: An In-depth Study of Faculty Needs and Ways of Meeting Them. Interim Report  CSHE Research and Occasional Papers Series (May, 2008)

Some interesting publication trends of Brown University authors

Peer Review:

Author Rights:

  • Authors and Their Rights This ARL sponsored site, includes a list of author rights websites at major U.S. research universities.
  • Creative Commons "Creative Commons provides free tools that let authors, scientists, artists, and educators easily mark their creative work with the freedoms they want it to carry. You can use CC to change your copyright terms from "All Rights Reserved" to "Some Rights Reserved."  An excellent 3:20 video explaining the basics can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DKm96Ftfko
  • GNU Free Documentation License "The purpose of this License is to make a manual, textbook, or other functional and useful document "free" in the sense of freedom: to assure everyone the effective freedom to copy and redistribute it, with or without modifying it, either commercially or noncommercially. Secondarily, this License preserves for the author and publisher a way to get credit for their work, while not being considered responsible for modifications made by others." Preamble
  • Sherpa-Romeo: Publisher Copyright Policies and Self-Archiving "Use this site to find a summary of permissions that are normally given as part of each publisher's copyright transfer agreement"
  • Sherpa-Juliet Use this site to find a summary of policies given by various research funders as part of their grant awards and includes information on research funders' policies on open access data archiving and open access publishing.
  •  SPARC Author Addendum: "The SPARC [Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition] Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher's agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles. The Author Addendum is a free resource developed by SPARC in partnership with Creative Commons and Science Commons, established non-profit organizations that offer a range of copyright options for many different creedcentral.nih.gov/]) and green is self-archiving (examples ArXiv, a disciplinary archive, and institutional archives as found at universities).
  • Harnad, S.  Eprints: Electronic Prepints and Postprints Harnad, S. (2003). Encyclopedia of Library and Information ScienceMarcel Dekker, Inc.  Useful definitions. Preprint "drafts of a research paper before peer review" . Postprint "drafts of a research paper after peer review" _ _Sherpa-Romeo Pre-print and Post-print defines pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.  The publisher's version may have been copy edited to meet its own standards type-setting and formatting.  Current examples - preprint ArXiv preprints reviewed by peers within the ArXiv structure and postprint NIH requirement for PubMed Central and article in Nature.
  • Open Access and the Progress of Science -- Alma Swan in the 2007 May-June issue of American Scientist demonstrates with data that research impact can be achieved by author self-archiving.
  • The Institutional Repository Rediscovered: What Can a University Do for Open Access Publishing -- Jean-Gabriel Bankier (President of The Berkeley Electronic Press) and Irene Perciali (Director of Journals) has written an article which does promote BePress' Digital Commons product.  However, the authors support their argument that a university's "institutional repository" needs to be more than an archive.  They suggest that giving faculty tools to manage their own self-publishing and niche OA publishing will serve scholarly communications.  The Gold road of OA can be achieved as well as the Green Road of self-archiving.

Institutional Repository

The Brown University Library should make our future FEDORA-based Institutional Repository (IR) a platform for the re-purposing of our intellectual capital -- those materials that support research, teaching, and dissemination on our campus (and in some cases beyond). In addition to freely distributing published material, well designed and deeply populated IRs can provide platforms for integrating a wide variety of other associated materials (e.g. teaching tools, simulations, data sets, etc.) created within a university. Brown should educate our faculty about IR issues, and attempt to have our faculty take a more active role in the dissemination of all representations of their scholarship.

Campus administrators (provosts, deans) must take the lead in encouraging contributions; mandates for deposit will only work if participants understand the value of their actions. Librarians should educate faculty about the short-term and long-term issues within the scholarly communication realm, in order that they can then serve as informed advocates for IRs within their own departments or schools.

Institutional Repository Bibliography – a listing of sites and publications.

Impact Factors:

  • Citation Statistics: A report from the International Mathematical Union (IMU) in cooperation with the International Council of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM) and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS). Revised 6/12/o8 by the Joint Committee on the Quantitative Assessment of Research.  The executive summary is a must read by faculty and university administrators.

Measuring Author's Citation History

  • h-index (info to follow)
  • g-index (info to follow) 

Open-Source Electronic Publishing

Open Access

Question: Is the NIH inititive considered Open Access?
Answer: No, there can be up to a 12-month embargo on materials added into the PubMed Central platform, so this NIH initiative does not provide full OA until that time has passed.

  • PLoS and BioMed Central institutional support:

PLoS membership levels are determined by how much your institution has published with PLoS within a 12 month period and how much you have entered into Pub Med. There is no way to accurately predict the annual fee, and it has risen every year for those institutions supporting this model; in some cases by a factor of 5. For this institutional investment the author receieves a 10% publication discount. Brown has determined that it is not advantageous to support this model at the moment, especially as this approach has not resulted in the lowering of completing journal prices. BioMed Central has a similar pricing model, and has reduced its per article discount from 20% to 15%.

  • Harnad, S.  Eprints: Electronic Prepints and Postprints Harnad, S. (2003). Encyclopedia of Library and Information ScienceMarcel Dekker, Inc.  Useful definitions. Preprint "drafts of a research paper before peer review" . Postprint "drafts of a research paper after peer review" _ _Sherpa-Romeo Pre-print and Post-print defines pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.  The publisher's version may have been copy edited to meet its own standards type-setting and formatting.  Current examples - preprint ArXiv preprints reviewed by peers within the ArXiv structure and postprint NIH requirement for PubMed Central and article in Nature.
  • Open Access and the Progress of Science -- Alma Swan in the 2007 May-June issue of American Scientist demonstrates with data that research impact can be achieved by author self-archiving.
  • The Institutional Repository Rediscovered: What Can a University Do for Open Access Publishing -- Jean-Gabriel Bankier (President of The Berkeley Electronic Press) and Irene Perciali (Director of Journals) has written an article which does promote BePress' Digital Commons product.  However, the authors support their argument that a university's "institutional repository" needs to be more than an archive.  They suggest that giving faculty tools to manage their own self-publishing and niche OA publishing will serve scholarly communications.  The Gold road of OA can be achieved as well as the Green Road of self-archiving.
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