Cave Writing syllabus - Spring 10

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instructor: John Cayley
office hours: Tuesdays 9-11 and by appointment
68 1/2 Brown Street, rm 205

Grad Center Tower E 123
Wednesdays 3-5.20pm
 


1. (Jan 27) - introduction

    - introduction to the course | discussion of aims
    - initial thoughts concerning possible collaboration | complementary skills sets. writing + CS / music / audio visual experience.

    assignments

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


2. (Feb 3) - text . edit . file

    - introduction to the Cave Writing Text Editor. However, I will also discuss underlying questions of what editors are; what they tell us about language; and what they do to language. In particular, we'll discuss editors that are implemented as software.
    - introduction to this, the writing digitial media wiki.
    - one or two Cave presentations of earlier student work. 
    - basic use of the ccv Linux system: copying files, uploading and downloading files.

    assignments

  • Read: Noah Wardrip-Fruin's description of Screen and follow the links from this blog entry to material at the Iowa Review Web.
  • Using the Editor, make a first Cave Writing piece, however minimal, that will run on the Cave Writing desktop preview.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


3. (Feb 10) - AV 3D

    - discussion of 'Screen' by Wardrip-Fruin et al.
    - please bring your laptops to the meeting (on which the Cave Text Editor should be succesfully installed).
    - present your first Cave piece in the desktop preview. If you have not been successful in making a first piece, we will collectively troubleshoot.
    - otherwise, we will discuss and demonstrate the embedding of audio and other media in Cave Writing projects using the editor.

    assignments

  • Read 'An Interview with John Cayley on Torus by Rita Raley.' Iowa Review Web 8, no. 3 (Sept. 2006).
  • Have a look at this jpg image produced by Brown student Nicholas Chung for the Fall'07 Electronic Writing II course, and visit this website by Thomas Broome. Now, using text objects only, make a Cave Writing piece that uses text to construct and define an architectural space: interior or exterior; naturalistic or fantastical. Consider the relationship of the language that constitutes your texts objects (this may be composed or 'found') to the significance and affect of your piece. You have until course week 5 for this assignment.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


4. (Feb 17) - timelines & events

    - presentations of the assignments.
    - discussion of any coding issues that were encountered.
    - introduction to timelines and events.
    - the Walls Do Not Exist.
    - discuss conference presentation at Siegen.
    - any issues with Cave accounts and use of the Cave system should be sorted out by now, troubleshoot if not.

    assignments

  • If you have not already done so, run a Cave Writing Project in the Cave.
  • If you have not already done so, add your own pages to the wiki:
  1. cWriting -> Cave Writing students - Spring 10 -> (linking page with your name) -> (your top-level page)

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


5. (Feb 24) - plan it

    - have you added your notes and project pages?
    - designs, maquettes, storyboards, materials?
    - selected presentations and critiques of any work that has so far been produced.
    - technical issues: I will ask John Huffman to attend the class and discuss any likely technical points relating to project ideas.

    assignments

  • The required description of your final project is due before the start of the next, course week 6. This should be posted to one of your personal or group pages under the 'Cave projects - Fall 08' page. Provide a design, maquette, storyboard or some other initial material or documentation of your ideas toward your final project.
  • As part of the process of making your project plan, scour the internet and find a site with expressive technical material that is of direct relevance to cultural representations in (virtual) 3D. Add a link to this site and a brief description highlighting its significance to the (wdm > cave writing resources > ) Websites - Cave-Related page of this wiki.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


6. (Mar 3) - project building phase commences ...

Presentation of plans/outlines for final projects.

    - where not already covered due to issues arising, review use of the tracker and pointing devices for events, etc.
    - from now on our work settles into a routine that is focused on our various projects, each week selected projects are presented, discussed, critiqued and workshopped.

    assignments

  • Review: Wardrip-Fruin, Noah, and Nick Monfort, eds. The New Media Reader. Find at least one chapter/essay/section in this book that speaks to the content or form of your project.
  • Continue work on your projects; add notes, add explanatory and illustrative materials to notes and project pages as appropriate.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


7. (Mar 10) ... and continues ...

    - report to the class briefly on the chapter/essay/section of the New Media Reader that you found useful.
    - selected presentations, discussions, critiques, workshopping.

    assignments

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


8. (Mar 17) ... and continues ...

    - report to the class briefly on the link that you found useful.
    - discussion of timing and format for end-of-semester presentations.

    assignments

  • Individual Cave meetings to be set up in groups of one or two with John Cayley over the coming week.
  • Continue work on your projects, add notes, add explanatory and illustrative materials to notes and project pages as appropriate.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


9. (Mar 24) ... and continues ...

    - selected presentations, discussions, critiques, workshopping.

    assignments

  • Visit the Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 1and try to find one work that speaks to your project in some way.
  • Continue work on your projects, add notes, add explanatory and illustrative materials to notes and project pages as appropriate.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


(Mar 31 Spring Recess - no class)


10. (Apr 7) ... and continues ...

    - report to the class briefly on the work you found useful.
    - selected presentations, discussions, critiques, workshopping.

    assignments

  • Continue work on your projects; add notes, add explanatory and illustrative materials to notes and project pages as appropriate.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


11. (Apr 14) ... and nears completion ...

    - discussions, critiques, workshopping.
    - briefly present the formal description of your projects to the class, with discussion as necessary: an exercise in public presentation.
    - schedule devised for the final public Cave Writing presentations.

CLICK HERE to sign up for the showing of the final presentations that you are able to host.

    assignments

  • Continue work on your projects; add notes, add explanatory and illustrative materials to notes and project pages as appropriate.
  • A required, finalized two-three page illustrated description of your project will be due before the beginning of the next class.
  • Final projects should be almost complete and ready for class and public presentation.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


12. (Apr 21) ... and does some final reconfiguration ...

    - discussion of the public presentations.

    assignments

  • Finish any incomplete documentation of your projects; add notes, add explanatory and illustrative materials to notes and project pages as appropriate.

Comments on the readings and/or the course for this week


13. (Apr 28) Rehearsal of Final Presentations.

    - final projects are ready for presentation and final critique.
 


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